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Using “AIDET” To Successfully Communicate With Your Patients

Using “AIDET” To Successfully Communicate With Your Patients

 

In school, we are taught a list of history questions to ask patients.

But,  how often do we allow patients to ask us questions?  And should we?

The Journal of American Medical Association Neurology recently published an opinion commentary addressing fundamental questions every patient has but never asks.  While the article is geared towards physicians, it is applicable to all healthcare providers.  Keeping the patient’s concerns in mind can help solidify the relationships with our patients and improve adherence to the treatment plan.

Research repetitively shows that one of the largest predictors of successful care is the patient thinking the treatment or provider will help.

While it may seem daunting to keep these concerns in mind, many places use a simple framework called “AIDET.”  It is a simple acronym that represents an easy but powerful way to communicate with people that improves connection, expectation, and compliance.  

 
  • Acknowledge (use person-first language and call the patient by their preferred name. Key message “you are important”)
  • Introduce (who you are and what role you play in their care. Key message “you are in good hands” )
  • Duration (what can you expect today and in the future.  Key message “I anticipate your concerns”)
  • Explain (who, what, why, next steps. Key message “I want you to be informed and comfortable”)
  • Thanks (thank the patient for taking the time to see you. Key message “I appreciate the opportunity to care for you”)

How do you think you can implement the commentary or this framework in your practice?

 

Link to cited article: “Five Questions Every Patient Has but Never Asks”

 

 

Valerie Bobb

Valerie has been a physical therapist and athletic trainer for 18 years and currently works in a hospital-based clinic in Seattle, WA. Valerie started her career working with athletes and researching the female athlete. Early in her career, she started working with pregnant clients and found a new love for Women’s and Men’s Health. She now has dedicated her career to treating patients with chronic pain, complaints during and after pregnancy, and pelvic floor dysfunction. Valerie teaches for the APTA and holds an adjunct professor position at Texas Woman’s University, teaching woman’s health curriculum.

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Valerie Bobb

Valerie Bobb

Valerie has been a physical therapist and athletic trainer for 18 years and currently works in a hospital-based clinic in Seattle, WA. Valerie started her career working with athletes and researching the female athlete. Early in her career, she started working with pregnant clients and found a new love for Women’s and Men’s Health.She now has dedicated her career to treating patients with chronic pain, complaints during and after pregnancy, and pelvic floor dysfunction.Valerie teaches for the APTA and holds an adjunct professor position at Texas Woman’s University, teaching woman’s health curriculum.
Valerie Bobb

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